• (727) 586-2681
  • 1472 Jordan Hills Court Clearwater, FL 33756

News

SEDATION
Dental anxiety affects many patients and can hinder them from taking the next step to achieve their oral health care goals. Dr. Britten is highly trained and certified in both IV conscious sedation and oral sedation.
He is one of the few Periodontists in the Tampa Bay area who offers IV sedation. Sedation dentistry can provide a calming experience for patients who have experienced high
levels of anxiety related to dental treatment.

IV CONSCIOUS SEDATION
Intravenous (IV) Sedation helps even our most anxious patients remain relaxed and comfortable during procedures. Many patients feel as though they, “went to sleep” during the sedation.
The goal of IV conscious sedation is not to provide general anesthesia but instead to allow our patients to remain conscious and relaxed with minimal risk during the procedure.

ORAL SEDATION
Is a prescription medication that can relieve anxiety patients feel before and during their dental exam. It allows patients to respond verbally and physically to directions all while in a very “restful” state.
Patients using oral sedation will need to be driven to and from the procedure.
You may be a candidate for Sedation Dentistry if you have experienced any of the following:
High Fear
Had traumatic dental experiences
Difficulty getting numb
A bad gag reflex
Very sensitive teeth
A fear of needles and shots
Aversion to the noises, smells, and tastes associated with dental care

LOCAL ANESTHETIC
For most periodontal procedures, a local anesthetic is utilized to numb the area being treated.
Some anesthetics are short acting and others last several hours. Dr. Britten will determine which local anesthetics are best for the procedure.

Questions? Contact:

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As we continue to face uncertainty as a community due to COVID-19 and the social distancing guidelines passed down from the federal, state and local leadership, our team at Britten Periodontics & Implant Dentistry has realized the continued importance of strong and ongoing relationships.

We want you to know that we are here for you!

Where We’ve Been

When we think about the individuals that bring us joy in fulfilling our vision for health and well-being, we immediately think of you, our patients and friends. We miss you greatly and are continuing to find ways of connecting with you regularly and being available for you in any way possible as we get ready for opening the practice beyond emergency appointments.

The original goal of the reduction to Emergency Care only was to suppress the spread of the virus and reduce the use of protective masks, surgical gowns, and other personal protective equipment (PPE) that hospitals and clinics found in short supply. This also gave us an opportunity to reinforce what we have always done when it comes to sterilization and infection controls, as well as implement additional steps to make sure that every patient can be assured a safe dental experience.

Where We’re Going

We are very excited to announce that our practice reopened on May 18, 2020, for a wider spectrum of dental care. We have been working diligently to replenish our supplies, so that we are ready with a new schedule in place that ensures the safety and comfort for both team and patients, as we return to full care and service.

Our team has worked hard to reach out to patients who have had to cancel their appointments due to the shut down as well as patients who are currently scheduled in the up-coming months to confirm new appointments that promote social distancing mandates and protect our most vulnerable. Our new scheduling options are designed to address individual oral healthcare needs and maintain a safe and sterile environment.

If you have NOT gotten a text or email from us to reschedule, or are confused about your appointment status, please call (727-586-2681) or email us at healthysmiles@brittenperio.com.

Our office follows infection control recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). You may see some changes when it is time for your next appointment. We made these changes to help protect our patients and staff that we wanted to share.

We know things will be different, but one thing that will never change is our commitment to your safety, comfort and dental health! We’ve missed you and are excited to see your smiling faces again!  Thank you for being our patient. We value your trust and loyalty and look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors and friends.

We have made the following changes to help protect our patients and staff that we wanted to share.

  • We have developed a system in the office to maintain the highest level of sterility and disinfection. This includes treatment areas as always, but we have elevated our infection protocols to also include increased and frequent cleaning of all common areas in the building of all surfaces, including door handles, faucets and countertops.
  • Our office will communicate with you beforehand to ask some screening questions. You’ll be asked those same questions again when you are in the office.
  • We are screening all patients for recent travel, fever or signs of respiratory illness. If travel has occurred or symptoms are present, please do not schedule a visit in our office until 2 weeks has passed.
  • Our reception area (waiting room) will be temporarily CLOSED; please honor our NO VISITOR POLICY. Visitors will be permitted for extreme exceptions only, which must be pre-approved before arriving.
  • We have a touchless hand sanitizer at the front desk that we will ask you to use when you enter the office. You will also find some in the reception area and other places in the office for you to use as needed.
  • Please bring a MASK of face covering with you to wear in all common areas of the building. If you do not have one, we will provide one prior to your entry into the building. Please let us know if you need one.
  • When you arrive to the office PLEASE STAY IN YOUR CAR and CALL 727-586-2681 to “Check in”.
  • We will be taking all patient TEMPERATURES.
  • A pre-rinse of hydrogen peroxide will be performed with your care provider at your appointment to reduce microbial numbers, as recommended by the ADA.
  • All staff members will be wearing CDC and OSHA recommended personal protective equipment, even our administrative staff to some degree. Don’t worry; your favorite faces are still here behind those masks! This measure is to protect you as much as possible while in our care. Please know that our administrative staff is as friendly and eager to talk to you as always and ALWAYS available for longer discussions or question & answer sessions over the phone or by email.
  • If possible, please pay for your visit over the phone prior to your appointment. Otherwise, we are able to accept payment in a contact-less manner.

If you have any questions about any of the above changes or guidelines, we will be happy to discuss them further and answer any questions

 

Our team at Britten Periodontics has realized the continued importance of strong and on-going relationships.

We want you to know that we are here for you!

Where We’ve Been

When we think about the individuals that bring us joy in fulfilling our vision for health and well-being, we immediately think of you, our patients and friends. We miss you greatly and are continuing to find ways of connecting with you regularly and being available for you in any way possible as we get ready for opening the practice beyond emergency appointments.

The original goal of the reduction to Emergency Care only was to suppress the spread of the virus and reduce the use of protective masks, surgical gowns, and other personal protective equipment (PPE) that hospitals and clinics found in short supply. This also gave us an opportunity to reinforce what we have always done when it comes to sterilization and infection controls, as well as implement additional steps to make sure that every patient can be assured a safe dental experience.

Where We’re Going

We are very excited to announce that our practice will be opening as of 5/6/2020 for a wider spectrum of dental care. And likely on 5/18/2020 for dental hygiene services. We have been working diligently to replenish our supplies, so that we are ready with a new schedule in place that ensures the safety and comfort for both team and patients, as we return to full care and service.

Our team is now reaching out to patients who have had to cancel their appointments due to the shut down as well as patients who are currently scheduled in the up-coming months to confirm new appointments that promote social distancing mandates and protect our most vulnerable. Our new scheduling options are designed to address individual oral healthcare needs and maintain a safe and sterile environment.

Rest assured, Britten Periodontics, as always, will place the health and well-being of our team and our patients first. We will continue to reach out and update you on a regular basis through various forms of contact. Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and our blog https://brittenperio.com/our-blog/ for up to date information as well as tips and resources on how to maintain your oral hygiene at home during these times.

We look forward to seeing you all again and catching up with you at your next appointment.

Stay Healthy,
Dr. Todd Britten

Our community has been through a lot over the last few months, and all of us are looking forward to resuming our normal habits and routines. While many things have changed, one thing has remained the same: our commitment to your safety.

Infection control has always been a top priority for our practice and you may have seen this during your visits to our office. Our infection control processes are made so that when you receive care, it’s both safe
and comfortable. We want to tell you about the infection control procedures we follow in our practice to
keep patients and staff safe.

Our office follows infection control recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA) www.ada.org, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/infection-control.html and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/covid-19/standards.html. We follow the activities of these agencies so that we are up-to-date on any new rulings or guidance that may be issued. We do this to make sure that our infection control procedures are current and adhere to each agencies’ recommendations.

You may see some changes when it is time for your next appointment. We made these changes to help
protect our patients and staff. For example:

• Our office will communicate with you beforehand to ask some screening questions. You’ll be
asked those same questions again when you are in the office.
• We have hand sanitizer that we will ask you to use when you enter the office. You will also find
some in the reception area and other places in the office for you to use as needed.
• You may see that our reception area will no longer offer magazines or other reading materials,
since those items are difficult to clean and disinfect.
• Appointments will be managed to allow for social distancing between patients. That might mean
that you’re offered fewer options for scheduling your appointment.
• We will do our best to allow greater time between patients to reduce waiting times for you, as well
as to reduce the number of patients in the reception area at any one time.

We look forward to seeing you again and are happy to answer any questions you may have about the steps we take to keep you, and every patient, safe in our practice. To make an appointment, please call our office at 727-586-2681.

Thank you for being our patient. We value your trust and loyalty and look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors and friends.

Sincerely,
Dr. Todd Britten and Team


 

To Our Dear Patients and Community,

Your health is our top priority, and we appreciate the trust you place in us. The COVID-19 outbreak and its impact on our daily lives is rapidly evolving. Dr. Britten and his team are keeping up to date with the most current information and resources from the Centers for Disease Control, American Dental Association, Florida Dental Association, Florida Department of Health, OSHA, National Institute of Health and Florida legislature. We await their guidance to help navigate our patients and practice through this unprecedented time.

The American Dental Association (ADA) recommended on March 16 that dentists restrict their practices to all but urgent and emergency care. On March 20th, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis ordered all dental offices in our state to postpone all elective dental procedures until May 8th. Our expectations are that this may extend further, and we are rescheduling patients into June at this time.

Conditions that would be considered urgent/emergent would include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Moderate to severe pain and/or soreness
  • Swelling of your gums, face, or neck
  • Uncontrolled bleeding
  • Signs of infection
  • Trauma
  • Medically necessary procedures to treat pain, infection, disease, or the likely potential thereof

If you experience a dental emergency, Dr. Britten is readily available to take care of any dental advice or emergency care. You can reach us via phone at 727-586-2681 on Monday and Thursday, and after hours and all other days at 813-493-1250 (text or call).

The safety of  our patients and all dental team members has been and always will be always be our greatest concern. We are eagerly awaiting any reopening protocols from the experts and authorities for our office. We will continue to update and educate our staff, patients and community on any and all safety guidelines and treatment protocols as they become established.

Thank you

Britten Periodontics & Implant Dentistry

 

Our office offers a minimally ­invasive periodontal surgery procedure called the LANAP protocol.

Gum disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tissue and bone around the teeth. If left untreated, the disease can lead to receding gums, loss of bone, and ultimately tooth loss.

Dr. Britten has received intensive training in the LANAP protocol by the Institute for Advanced Laser Dentistry. The LANAP protocol is the only laser periodontitis treatment scientifically and clinically proven to regenerate soft tissue and bone. The surgery is performed here in our practice with the only laser specifically designed for the LANAP protocol ­­ the PerioLase MVP­7.

What is LANAP?
The LANAP protocol is the only laser periodontitis treatment that is cleared by the U.S. FDA and is clinically and historically proven to regenerate new gum, tissue, ligament and bone
Who is a candidate for LANAP laser surgery?

Patients with moderate ­to severe gum disease can especially benefit from the LANAP protocol. The LANAP protocol is also an excellent treatment option for patients who are fearful of conventional scalpel surgery and patients taking certain medications, such as blood thinners. It is important to state however, that not every patient is a candidate for laser surgery, it all depends on the individual. Dr. Britten will thoroughly explore all options to help you keep your teeth and gums healthy.

Several research studies have suggested that periodontal disease is connected to variety of other diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Scientists believe that inflammation may be the basis for the link between these systemic diseases. Recent research demonstrates that inflammation may be responsible for the association. Therefore, treating inflammation may not only help manage periodontal diseases but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.

DIABETES AND PERIODONTAL DISEASE
Diabetic patients are more likely to develop periodontal disease, which in turn can increase blood sugar and diabetic complications.
People with diabetes are more likely to have periodontal disease than people without diabetes, probably because people with diabetes are more susceptible to contracting infections. In fact, periodontal disease is often considered a complication of diabetes. People who have poorly controlled diabetes are especially at risk.
Research has suggested that the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease goes both ways – periodontal disease may make it more difficult for people who have diabetes to control their blood sugar. Severe periodontal disease can increase blood sugar, contributing to increased periods of time when the body functions with a high blood sugar. This puts people with diabetes at increased risk for diabetic complications.

HEART DISEASE
Several studies have shown that periodontal disease is associated with heart disease. Research has indicated that periodontal disease increases the risk of heart disease. Scientists believe that inflammation caused by periodontal disease may be responsible for the association.
Periodontal disease can also exacerbate existing heart conditions. Patients at risk for infective endocarditis may require antibiotics prior to dental procedures. Dr. Britten and your cardiologist will be able to determine if your heart condition requires use of antibiotics prior to dental procedures.
STROKE
Additional studies have pointed to a relationship between periodontal disease and stroke. In one recent study people diagnosed with acute cerebrovascular ischemia were found more likely to have an oral infection when compared to those in the control group.

OSTEOPOROSIS
Researchers have suggested that there is a link between osteoporosis and bone loss in the jaw. Studies suggest that osteoporosis may lead to tooth loss because the density of the bone that supports the teeth may be decreased, which means the teeth no longer have a solid foundation.
RESPIRATORY DISEASE
Research has found that bacteria that grow in the oral cavity can be aspirated into the lungs to cause respiratory diseases such as pneumonia, especially in people with periodontal disease.
CANCER
Researchers found that men with gum disease were 49% more likely to develop kidney cancer, 54% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer, and 30% more likely to develop blood cancers.

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Our occlusion (bite) forces are evenly distributed among all of our teeth. When something occurs to alter a healthy occlusion; like loss of a tooth, clenching and grinding, occlusal trauma can occur. There are several signs and symptoms of occlusal trauma including, wear or chipping of the teeth, sensitive crevices on the teeth, gum recession, shifting teeth, tender muscles, headaches, or a “popping” sound when opening and closing your mouth. This trauma places excessive pressure on teeth and these forces can contribute to bone loss and result in the loosening of the teeth. The goal of occlusal therapy is to create an even distribution of these forces allowing the bone and ligaments to heal. This is done by an occlusal adjustment or equilibration to divide the biting pressure evenly across all of the teeth by reshaping the biting surfaces of the teeth and eliminating spots of excessive pressure when the teeth are brought into contact. The use of an occlusal night guard may be needed to control the pressures generated by clenching and grinding.

For more information about non-surgical procedures for gum disease, visit:

Non-­Surgical Procedures

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When you have periodontal disease, the supporting tissue and bone is destroyed, forming “pockets” around the teeth. Over time, these pockets become deeper, providing a larger space for bacteria to live. Traditionally, gum disease is treated by eliminating these gum pockets and creating a clean environment around the tooth so that the tooth or teeth can be retained rather than lost. The infected gum tissue is trimmed away and uneven bone tissue re¬contoured. Periodontal flap surgical therapy remains one of the most effective ways of treating gum disease.

For more information on the surgical procedures performed in our office, visit our website at:

Surgical Procedures

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“There’s more to your dental visit than just preventing or treating teeth or gum problems,” states Clearwater Periodontist Dr. Todd Britten. Dental professionals are also on the lookout for a number of potential soft tissue problems that could occur in or around your mouth. “There are many soft tissue conditions of the mouth that we evaluate for during a periodontal or general dental examination, but one of our biggest growing concerns is oral cancer,” says Dr. Britten.

In the last 10-15 years, a type of cancer affecting the head and neck has snowballed. That threat is human papillomavirus, or HPV. This cancer is often found on the tongue, mouth or throat and is caused by the human papillomavirus HPV type 16, which is the same high-risk HPV that causes cervical cancer.

Oral HPV lesion on the gumline

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An April 2017 data brief released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows the prevalence of HPV of all types was 7.3% among U.S. adults ages 18 to 69. Four percent of that population carries the high-risk HPV.1

“Most types of oral HPV go away before they cause any health issues,” Britten says. He explains that if a patient develops oral warts, also known as an oral papilloma due to HPV, it can be removed by surgical removal, cryotherapy, which is where the wart is frozen, or interferon alfa-2B (Intron A, Roferon-A), which is an injection.

Although most people who are exposed to the virus clear it, the virus can remain persistent. “Those who are unable to clear it end up having a risk of developing the oral form of this cancer,” says Dr. Richard Jordan D.D.S., Ph.D, professor of Oral pathology, Pathology and Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, who recently presented “HPV: An old foe in a new form” at the March 2017 American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.

“Most of the people that have this virus persisting in their bodies probably picked it up 20 years ago, when they first become sexually active. The virus makes a home in their throats or tongues, sits there for 20 years and eventually develops into cancer in their 40s or 50s,” he says. “This is actually the same story as with the cervix in women… Most women get rid of the virus, but some are unable to clear the virus. They’re the ones that end up getting in trouble with cervical precancers.”

The number of people impacted by the oral cancer due to HPV is growing, but due to regular pap smears, cervical cancer rates have declined. Dr. Richards projects that by 2030 there will be more patients per 100,000 with mouth cancer due to HPV, compared to cervical cancer.

Dr. Todd Britten states that this leads us to believe that dental specialists such as restorative dentists, periodontists, and dental hygienists, who often see their patients for preventative or periodontal maintenance visits anywhere from every 3 to 6 months, are in the perfect position to screen for oral cancer in the hopes of catching it in its precancerous stages.

In under 30 seconds, your dental professional will scan the oral cavity for abnormalities. HPV disease mostly occurs in the tongue and in the tonsil region, so examining the tongue, the sides of the tongue and the base of the tongue and the tonsillar region. An oral cancer screening, including the HPV screening exam includes looking for an ulcer or an abnormal growth. “Patients should also do an at-home screening monthly using a flashlight, and report any sores or growths that seem unusual and do not go away by themselves in two weeks, or constantly reoccur,” says Dr. Todd Britten. If an abnormal growth is detected, Dr. Britten says he is able to perform some biopsies in his Clearwater Florida practice, and when necessary, refer to an oral surgeon.

Sometimes, infection with HPV in the oral cavity has no evidence of sores or growth. Early symptoms of oropharyngeal cancer include trouble swallowing, constant earaches, coughing up blood, unexplained weight loss, enlarged lymph nodes constant sore throats, lumps on the cheeks, growths or lumps on the neck, hoarseness or trouble speaking.

If you notice any of these symptoms and you know or think you may have HPV, make an appointment with your doctor immediately.

Treatment options are available for oral cancer caused by HPV. The treatment and prognosis depend on the stage and location of the cancer and whether or not it’s associated with HPV. Treatment for cancer caused by HPV can include radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination of these. The good news is HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers have better outcomes and fewer relapses after treatment than HPV-negative cancers.

Dr. Richard Jordan also reports that non-smokers respond very well to radiation treatment for HPV oral cancers, while unfortunately, smokers tend to have fairly aggressive disease and a poor five-year survival rate, according to Dr. Jordan.

“After five years, about 60% will be dead; about 40% will be alive,” he says. “HPV responds very well to currently available cancer therapies. If the patient doesn’t smoke, the five-year survival rate is extraordinarily high—at 80 or 90%.”

A periodontist is mainly concerned with diagnosing and treating soft tissue problems. Some soft tissue conditions include Lichen Planus, Benign Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid, Geographic Tongue, Burning Mouth Syndrome, Apthous Ulcers and Oral Mucositis from Chemotherapy, among many others. “Oral cancer screenings are part of our regular soft tissue evaluation,” says Dr. Britten. We work with the finest general dentists and oral surgeons to catch any irregular, precancerous or cancerous conditions in our patients’ mouths.